THE PLEASURES OF COOKING FOR EIGHTY

What would it be like, I wondered, to cook for eighty hungry people, particularly for someone like me who is used to cooking for one. So I decided to try it and last Saturday I joined forces with the seasoned crew at Holy Trinity Church in the Yorkville neighborhood of Manhattan, who prepare a supper every week for anyone who is in need of a warm, nourishing meal.

Usually between eighty and a hundred people show up and the kitchen crew has to be ready to serve by 5:15 with the tables nicely set. The schedule is tight because the premises are given over to the Trinity Thrift Shop that same day and there are stacks and hangers full of secondhand clothing spread out all over the ample basement with last minute purchases being toted up. Then suddenly it’s time to clean up the clutter and transform the space into an orderly dining hall before the doors open and the hungry, lined up outside, descend. But this moment of tension only lends to the drama. And that’s always part of the fun when you are giving a dinner party.

Meanwhile, we the sous-chefs have been busy doing the prep work, slicing the baguettes and boules from six large sacks of crusty breads (made even crustier because they are yesterday’s loaves) that Eli’s has donated. That’s a lot of bread. But just when I start to ache I remember Julia Child’s characteristic remark when someone complained about beating the egg whites by hand: “Nonsense. It’s good for the upper arm muscles.”

Suddenly as we are finishing up, about a dozen teenagers descend the basement stairs and are introduced by our pastor as new helpers. It seems that they are from a Staten Island high school and that they wanted to do something helpful so they Googled soup kitchens and read about Holy Trinity’s program. They immediately throw themselves into the work, quickly clearing out the dining room, arranging the long tables, covering them in sheets of white paper to simulate linen table cloths, and setting places with real cutlery—no plastic knives and forks for the HTC guests.

As I look around the busy kitchen, I realize that the unassuming Bob Noorsesion, whom I’ve just met, is secretly the maitre de cuisine here, as though he had been born to the task. He doesn’t give orders; he just performs, gracefully and efficiently. It’s as though he had a timer in the back of his head, and we fall into step, taking up the choreography as we fill big baking trays with commercially prepared breaded chicken breasts, which he pops into the hot oven and automatically clocks. At the same time he tends to the frozen vegetable mix that goes into one of the huge pots of boiling water on the large restaurant stove and to the pasta which he shovels into another pot. When his automatic clock goes off, he hoists the pot (which I couldn’t have lifted without a crane) from stove to sink and drains the chunks of pasta, then tends to the veggies.

At last a cook’s task falls to me when the bowl of steaming pasta is put on the table. I get to toss it with butter and season it with salt and pepper until the balance is right. Fortunately as part of our bread service, we had peeled the foil wrappers from masses of those little pats of butter that restaurants serve so there is a huge pile of butter pats waiting to be tossed in and absorbed (Julia would have approved of that!).

Even the dishing up, arranging the food on real plates with a dollop of tomato sauce on top, is done with care. Just before everyone dives in, Lydia Colon gives the guests a touching welcome. As a seasoned hostess of this kind of neighborhood service, she has learned how to handle the sly ones who try to stuff their pockets with sweets. The Two Little Red Hens Bakery on Second Avenue, just below 86th Street, always sends a dazzling array of beautifully wrought cakes to the suppers, and evidently if we’re not careful they’ll disappear before everyone gets a fair share. But Lydia knows how to fox them: she has the cakes artfully cut up in the kitchen, each slice containing one of the enchanting flowers sculpted with the different color icings and these portions are served with the dinner so that no one can say “I didn’t get my piece of cake.”

Anyway, the night that I am here, there is plenty to eat and second helpings to go around. Of course, there are a few complaints from some about what they can and can’t eat but there is a good feeling all around and, as I pour coffee at the tables, I feel the warmth and the appreciation. These people are our guests and they are glad to be at our table. There is even one table made up only of women, who seem to come regularly less out of a need for food than for the company.

A part of me wishes that we had really cooked the food we are offering. But then I thought of what that would entail: probably forty pounds of meat to make enough for a beef stew that would satisfy these appetites, to say nothing of all the prep work and careful tending involved in cooking up a really good boeuf bourguignon. We’d have to chop up enough onions to rival the pile that Meryl Streep produces in Julie and Julia. And think of all the big skillets needed for braising the onions and mushrooms separately to get a good glaze. No, I am enough of a realist to reluctantly bury that fantasy. But I do learn that by early summer the HTC kitchen gets fresh vegetables from the Community Supported Agriculture group that supplies garden produce as it comes into season. So I’ll be back to peel the carrots and wash the greens.

Meanwhile I cherish what one of the old regulars said to me as I poured him a second cup of coffee, and the look on his face as he said it: “Thank you, sweetheart, for bringing the sunshine.”

14 Responses to “THE PLEASURES OF COOKING FOR EIGHTY”

  1. Jessica says:

    A lovely recounting of what must have been a fulfilling day spent in service. It’s reminding me of a soup kitchen that I used to volunteer my time to in Pasadena and stirring thoughts of returning to help out. Thank you!

  2. Thanks for a lovely post. When my daughter was attending a Catholic elementary school here in Seattle, I somehow became the surrogate cook for her class as it wove its way from preschool all the way up to eighth grade. When a date was set for a class party, a teacher’s lunch, or a graduation dinner, all eyes were on me to produce.

    Over the years, I learned to love cooking for these growing children and was amazed at their love for real food and at their willingness to try new things. As the children marched towards adolescence, I decided it was time to move away from cupcakes. Hence, I ditched the cupcakes and readied my slow cooker. I started to experiment with heartier healthier dishes such spicy black bean chilis, seven layer bean dips and even simple veggie trays.

    As time marched on, their appetites grew. Their enthusiasm for “real food” was enchanting. It was obvious that they craved homemade fare. I soon learned to book the church’s former rectory kitchen. It was often an easier more efficient way to cook for the crowd.

    I always used real flatware and soon learned that I needed help. The parents were always willing to step up to the plate in order to help by donating ingredients, serving, cleaning and offering crowd control. These kids are now dispersed at high schools throughout Seattle, and I’m sure many of them are similar to that crowd of generous teens from Staten Island! I dearly miss my crew of enthusiastic eaters and their love for the communal meal! Thanks for such a unique post!

  3. Jennifer says:

    Thank you for such a beautifully written and thoughtful account! I also appreciate the way you describe the meal and the guests as you would any large gathering — your kindness, tact and generous heart do “bring the sunshine!”

  4. Nan says:

    It’s a great feeling to be able to help someone less fortunate…I have the opportunity to help with lunch at a battered women’s shelter once a month – I make what I’m asked and deliver it to a home and then it’s transported to the shelter…they don’t like a lot of people showing up. I don’t get to see the women and their kids eat what I’ve prepared but I do get a nice warm feeling from being able to help – it’s such a little thing but it means so much to them. Thanks for your post, I’m so glad you brought them sunshine! xo, Nan

  5. Rick says:

    It’s a great feeling to be able to help someone less fortunate…I have the opportunity to help with lunch at a battered women’s shelter once a month – I make what I’m asked and deliver it to a home and then it’s transported to the shelter…they don’t like a lot of people showing up. I don’t get to see the women and their kids eat what I’ve prepared but I do get a nice warm feeling from being able to help – it’s such a little thing but it means so much to them. Thanks for your post, I’m so glad you brought them sunshine! xo, Nan

  6. Ian says:

    Thanks for a lovely post. When my daughter was attending a Catholic elementary school here in Seattle, I somehow became the surrogate cook for her class as it wove its way from preschool all the way up to eighth grade. When a date was set for a class party, a teacher’s lunch, or a graduation dinner, all eyes were on me to produce.

    Over the years, I learned to love cooking for these growing children and was amazed at their love for real food and at their willingness to try new things. As the children marched towards adolescence, I decided it was time to move away from cupcakes. Hence, I ditched the cupcakes and readied my slow cooker. I started to experiment with heartier healthier dishes such spicy black bean chilis, seven layer bean dips and even simple veggie trays.

    As time marched on, their appetites grew. Their enthusiasm for “real food” was enchanting. It was obvious that they craved homemade fare. I soon learned to book the church’s former rectory kitchen. It was often an easier more efficient way to cook for the crowd.

    I always used real flatware and soon learned that I needed help. The parents were always willing to step up to the plate in order to help by donating ingredients, serving, cleaning and offering crowd control. These kids are now dispersed at high schools throughout Seattle, and I’m sure many of them are similar to that crowd of generous teens from Staten Island! I dearly miss my crew of enthusiastic eaters and their love for the communal meal! Thanks for such a unique post!

  7. Simon says:

    Thank you for such a beautifully written and thoughtful account! I also appreciate the way you describe the meal and the guests as you would any large gathering — your kindness, tact and generous heart do “bring the sunshine!”

  8. David Christen says:

    I think the Love and Respect being served with every meal nourishes even more than the food.
    Thank you Judith for transporting us with your writing.

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